In 1627, France created the Compagnie des Cent-Associés (company of one hundred associates). The company was responsible for handling affairs in New France in exchange for having control over the fur trade. It was the only company that was allowed to sell furs from New France. In exchange, the Compagnie des Cent-Associés hired colonists to come and settle in the colony, and pledged to do its best to make sure these settlers stayed in New France and started families.

The origins of the Company

The Compagnie des Cent-Associés was founded in 1627 by the Cardinal de Richelieu. It consisted of one hundred merchants and aristocrats who had been entrusted by the Cardinal to expand the colony. In exchange for having control over the fur trade, the company pledged to bring 4 000 settlers to New France within 15 years. In 1645, the Communauté des Habitants replaced the Compagnie des Cent-Associés because it failed to bring over enough colonists.

Author: Service national du Récit de l’univers social

See also – Traces of the past:

 

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